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TEKS 110 B, Grades 6-8

 

Analysis

https://tea.texas.gov/curriculum/teks/ 

 

TEKS 110.18, Grade 6

▲Top

  

  1. Writing/Writing Process. Students use elements of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing) to compose text. Students are expected to:
    1. plan a first draft by selecting a genre appropriate for conveying the intended meaning to an audience, determining appropriate topics through a range of strategies (e.g., discussion, background reading, personal interests, interviews), and developing a thesis or controlling idea;
    2. develop drafts by choosing an appropriate organizational strategy (e.g., sequence of events, cause-effect, compare-contrast) and building on ideas to create a focused, organized, and coherent piece of writing;
    3. revise drafts to clarify meaning, enhance style, include simple and compound sentences, and improve transitions by adding, deleting, combining, and rearranging sentences or larger units of text after rethinking how well questions of purpose, audience, and genre have been addressed;
    4. edit drafts for grammar, mechanics, and spelling; and
    5. revise final draft in response to feedback from peers and teacher and publish written work for appropriate audiences.

 

  1. Writing/Expository and Procedural Texts. Students write expository and procedural or work-related texts to communicate ideas and information to specific audiences for specific purposes. Students are expected to:
    1. create multi-paragraph essays to convey information about a topic that:
      1. present effective introductions and concluding paragraphs;
      2. guide and inform the reader's understanding of key ideas and evidence;
      3. include specific facts, details, and examples in an appropriately organized structure; and
      4. use a variety of sentence structures and transitions to link paragraphs;
    2. write informal letters that convey ideas, include important information, demonstrate a sense of closure, and use appropriate conventions (e.g., date, salutation, closing);
    3. write responses to literary or expository texts and provide evidence from the text to demonstrate understanding.

 

 

TEKS 110.19, Grade 7

▲Top

 

  1. Writing/Writing Process. Students use elements of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing) to compose text. Students are expected to:
    1. plan a first draft by selecting a genre appropriate for conveying the intended meaning to an audience, determining appropriate topics through a range of strategies (e.g., discussion, background reading, personal interests, interviews), and developing a thesis or controlling idea;
    2. develop drafts by choosing an appropriate organizational strategy (e.g., sequence of events, cause-effect, compare-contrast) and building on ideas to create a focused, organized, and coherent piece of writing;
    3. revise drafts to ensure precise word choice and vivid images; consistent point of view; use of simple, compound, and complex sentences; internal and external coherence; and the use of effective transitions after rethinking how well questions of purpose, audience, and genre have been addressed;
    4. edit drafts for grammar, mechanics, and spelling; and
    5. revise final draft in response to feedback from peers and teacher and publish written work for appropriate audiences.

 

  1. Writing/Expository and Procedural Texts. Students write expository and procedural or work-related texts to communicate ideas and information to specific audiences for specific purposes. Students are expected to:
    1. write a multi-paragraph essay to convey information about a topic that:
      1. presents effective introductions and concluding paragraphs;
      2. contains a clearly stated purpose or controlling idea;
      3. is logically organized with appropriate facts and details and includes no extraneous information or inconsistencies;
      4. accurately synthesizes ideas from several sources; and
      5. uses a variety of sentence structures, rhetorical devices, and transitions to link paragraphs;
    2. write a letter that reflects an opinion, registers a complaint, or requests information in a business or friendly context;
    3. write responses to literary or expository texts that demonstrate the writing skills for multi-paragraph essays and provide sustained evidence from the text using quotations when appropriate.
       

 

 TEKS 110.20, Grade 8

▲Top

 

  1. Writing/Writing Process. Students use elements of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing) to compose text. Students are expected to:
    1. plan a first draft by selecting a genre appropriate for conveying the intended meaning to an audience, determining appropriate topics through a range of strategies (e.g., discussion, background reading, personal interests, interviews), and developing a thesis or controlling idea;
    2. develop drafts by choosing an appropriate organizational strategy (e.g., sequence of events, cause-effect, compare-contrast) and building on ideas to create a focused, organized, and coherent piece of writing;
    3. revise drafts to ensure precise word choice and vivid images; consistent point of view; use of simple, compound, and complex sentences; internal and external coherence; and the use of effective transitions after rethinking how well questions of purpose, audience, and genre have been addressed;
    4. edit drafts for grammar, mechanics, and spelling; and
    5. revise final draft in response to feedback from peers and teacher and publish written work for appropriate audiences.

 

  1. Writing/Expository and Procedural Texts. Students write expository and procedural or work-related texts to communicate ideas and information to specific audiences for specific purposes. Students are expected to:
    1. write a multi-paragraph essay to convey information about a topic that:
      1. presents effective introductions and concluding paragraphs;
      2. contains a clearly stated purpose or controlling idea;
      3. is logically organized with appropriate facts and details and includes no extraneous information or inconsistencies;
      4. accurately synthesizes ideas from several sources; and
      5. uses a variety of sentence structures, rhetorical devices, and transitions to link paragraphs;
    2. write a letter that reflects an opinion, registers a complaint, or requests information in a business or friendly context;
    3. write responses to literary or expository texts that demonstrate the writing skills for multi-paragraph essays and provide sustained evidence from the text using quotations when appropriate;

 

 

 


 

Argumentative

https://tea.texas.gov/curriculum/teks/ 

 

TEKS 110.18, Grade 6

▲Top

 

  1. Writing/Writing Process. Students use elements of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing) to compose text. Students are expected to:
    1. plan a first draft by selecting a genre appropriate for conveying the intended meaning to an audience, determining appropriate topics through a range of strategies (e.g., discussion, background reading, personal interests, interviews), and developing a thesis or controlling idea;
    2. develop drafts by choosing an appropriate organizational strategy (e.g., sequence of events, cause-effect, compare-contrast) and building on ideas to create a focused, organized, and coherent piece of writing;
    3. revise drafts to clarify meaning, enhance style, include simple and compound sentences, and improve transitions by adding, deleting, combining, and rearranging sentences or larger units of text after rethinking how well questions of purpose, audience, and genre have been addressed;
    4. edit drafts for grammar, mechanics, and spelling; and
    5. revise final draft in response to feedback from peers and teacher and publish written work for appropriate audiences.

 

  1. Writing/Persuasive Texts. Students write persuasive texts to influence the attitudes or actions of a specific audience on specific issues. Students are expected to write persuasive essays for appropriate audiences that establish a position and include sound reasoning, detailed and relevant evidence, and consideration of alternatives.

 

 

TEKS 110.19, Grade 7 

▲Top

 

  1. Writing/Writing Process. Students use elements of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing) to compose text. Students are expected to:
    1. plan a first draft by selecting a genre appropriate for conveying the intended meaning to an audience, determining appropriate topics through a range of strategies (e.g., discussion, background reading, personal interests, interviews), and developing a thesis or controlling idea;
    2. develop drafts by choosing an appropriate organizational strategy (e.g., sequence of events, cause-effect, compare-contrast) and building on ideas to create a focused, organized, and coherent piece of writing;
    3. revise drafts to ensure precise word choice and vivid images; consistent point of view; use of simple, compound, and complex sentences; internal and external coherence; and the use of effective transitions after rethinking how well questions of purpose, audience, and genre have been addressed;
    4. edit drafts for grammar, mechanics, and spelling; and
    5. revise final draft in response to feedback from peers and teacher and publish written work for appropriate audiences

 

  1. Writing/Persuasive Texts. Students write persuasive texts to influence the attitudes or actions of a specific audience on specific issues. Students are expected to write a persuasive essay to the appropriate audience that:
    1. establishes a clear thesis or position;
    2. considers and responds to the views of others and anticipates and answers reader concerns and counter-arguments; and
    3. includes evidence that is logically organized to support the author's viewpoint and that differentiates between fact and opinion.

 

 

TEKS 110.20, Grade 8

▲Top

 

  1. Writing/Writing Process. Students use elements of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing) to compose text. Students are expected to:
    1. plan a first draft by selecting a genre appropriate for conveying the intended meaning to an audience, determining appropriate topics through a range of strategies (e.g., discussion, background reading, personal interests, interviews), and developing a thesis or controlling idea;
    2. develop drafts by choosing an appropriate organizational strategy (e.g., sequence of events, cause-effect, compare-contrast) and building on ideas to create a focused, organized, and coherent piece of writing;
    3. revise drafts to ensure precise word choice and vivid images; consistent point of view; use of simple, compound, and complex sentences; internal and external coherence; and the use of effective transitions after rethinking how well questions of purpose, audience, and genre have been addressed;
    4. edit drafts for grammar, mechanics, and spelling; and
    5. revise final draft in response to feedback from peers and teacher and publish written work for appropriate audiences.

 

  1. Writing/Persuasive Texts. Students write persuasive texts to influence the attitudes or actions of a specific audience on specific issues. Students are expected to write a persuasive essay to the appropriate audience that:
    1. establishes a clear thesis or position;
    2. considers and responds to the views of others and anticipates and answers reader concerns and counter-arguments; and
    3. includes evidence that is logically organized to support the author's viewpoint and that differentiates between fact and opinion.

 

 

 


 

Historical Analysis

https://tea.texas.gov/curriculum/teks/ 

 

TEKS 110.18, Grade 6 

▲Top

 

  1. Writing/Writing Process. Students use elements of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing) to compose text. Students are expected to:
    1. plan a first draft by selecting a genre appropriate for conveying the intended meaning to an audience, determining appropriate topics through a range of strategies (e.g., discussion, background reading, personal interests, interviews), and developing a thesis or controlling idea;
    2. develop drafts by choosing an appropriate organizational strategy (e.g., sequence of events, cause-effect, compare-contrast) and building on ideas to create a focused, organized, and coherent piece of writing;
    3. revise drafts to clarify meaning, enhance style, include simple and compound sentences, and improve transitions by adding, deleting, combining, and rearranging sentences or larger units of text after rethinking how well questions of purpose, audience, and genre have been addressed;
    4. edit drafts for grammar, mechanics, and spelling; and
    5. revise final draft in response to feedback from peers and teacher and publish written work for appropriate audiences.

 

  1. Writing/Expository and Procedural Texts. Students write expository and procedural or work-related texts to communicate ideas and information to specific audiences for specific purposes. Students are expected to:
    1. create multi-paragraph essays to convey information about a topic that:
      1. present effective introductions and concluding paragraphs;
      2. guide and inform the reader's understanding of key ideas and evidence;
      3. include specific facts, details, and examples in an appropriately organized structure; and
      4. use a variety of sentence structures and transitions to link paragraphs;
    2. write informal letters that convey ideas, include important information, demonstrate a sense of closure, and use appropriate conventions (e.g., date, salutation, closing);
    3. write responses to literary or expository texts and provide evidence from the text to demonstrate understanding.

 

 

TEKS 110.19, Grade 7

▲Top

 

  1. Writing/Writing Process. Students use elements of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing) to compose text. Students are expected to:
    1. plan a first draft by selecting a genre appropriate for conveying the intended meaning to an audience, determining appropriate topics through a range of strategies (e.g., discussion, background reading, personal interests, interviews), and developing a thesis or controlling idea;
    2. develop drafts by choosing an appropriate organizational strategy (e.g., sequence of events, cause-effect, compare-contrast) and building on ideas to create a focused, organized, and coherent piece of writing;
    3. revise drafts to ensure precise word choice and vivid images; consistent point of view; use of simple, compound, and complex sentences; internal and external coherence; and the use of effective transitions after rethinking how well questions of purpose, audience, and genre have been addressed;
    4. edit drafts for grammar, mechanics, and spelling; and
    5. revise final draft in response to feedback from peers and teacher and publish written work for appropriate audiences.

 

  1. Writing/Expository and Procedural Texts. Students write expository and procedural or work-related texts to communicate ideas and information to specific audiences for specific purposes. Students are expected to:
    1. write a multi-paragraph essay to convey information about a topic that:
      1. presents effective introductions and concluding paragraphs;
      2. contains a clearly stated purpose or controlling idea;
      3. is logically organized with appropriate facts and details and includes no extraneous information or inconsistencies;
      4. accurately synthesizes ideas from several sources; and
      5. uses a variety of sentence structures, rhetorical devices, and transitions to link paragraphs;
    2. write a letter that reflects an opinion, registers a complaint, or requests information in a business or friendly context;
    3. write responses to literary or expository texts that demonstrate the writing skills for multi-paragraph essays and provide sustained evidence from the text using quotations when appropriate.
       

 

TEKS 110.20, Grade 8

▲Top

 

  1. Writing/Writing Process. Students use elements of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing) to compose text. Students are expected to:
    1. plan a first draft by selecting a genre appropriate for conveying the intended meaning to an audience, determining appropriate topics through a range of strategies (e.g., discussion, background reading, personal interests, interviews), and developing a thesis or controlling idea;
    2. develop drafts by choosing an appropriate organizational strategy (e.g., sequence of events, cause-effect, compare-contrast) and building on ideas to create a focused, organized, and coherent piece of writing;
    3. revise drafts to ensure precise word choice and vivid images; consistent point of view; use of simple, compound, and complex sentences; internal and external coherence; and the use of effective transitions after rethinking how well questions of purpose, audience, and genre have been addressed;
    4. edit drafts for grammar, mechanics, and spelling; and
    5. revise final draft in response to feedback from peers and teacher and publish written work for appropriate audiences.

 

  1. Writing/Expository and Procedural Texts. Students write expository and procedural or work-related texts to communicate ideas and information to specific audiences for specific purposes. Students are expected to:
    1. write a multi-paragraph essay to convey information about a topic that:
      1. presents effective introductions and concluding paragraphs;
      2. contains a clearly stated purpose or controlling idea;
      3. is logically organized with appropriate facts and details and includes no extraneous information or inconsistencies;
      4. accurately synthesizes ideas from several sources; and
      5. uses a variety of sentence structures, rhetorical devices, and transitions to link paragraphs;
    2. write a letter that reflects an opinion, registers a complaint, or requests information in a business or friendly context;
    3. write responses to literary or expository texts that demonstrate the writing skills for multi-paragraph essays and provide sustained evidence from the text using quotations when appropriate;

 

 

 


 

Informative

https://tea.texas.gov/curriculum/teks/ 

 

TEKS 110.18, Grade 6 

▲Top

  

  1. Writing/Writing Process. Students use elements of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing) to compose text. Students are expected to:
    1. plan a first draft by selecting a genre appropriate for conveying the intended meaning to an audience, determining appropriate topics through a range of strategies (e.g., discussion, background reading, personal interests, interviews), and developing a thesis or controlling idea;
    2. develop drafts by choosing an appropriate organizational strategy (e.g., sequence of events, cause-effect, compare-contrast) and building on ideas to create a focused, organized, and coherent piece of writing;
    3. revise drafts to clarify meaning, enhance style, include simple and compound sentences, and improve transitions by adding, deleting, combining, and rearranging sentences or larger units of text after rethinking how well questions of purpose, audience, and genre have been addressed;
    4. edit drafts for grammar, mechanics, and spelling; and
    5. revise final draft in response to feedback from peers and teacher and publish written work for appropriate audiences.

 

  1. Writing/Expository and Procedural Texts. Students write expository and procedural or work-related texts to communicate ideas and information to specific audiences for specific purposes. Students are expected to:
    1. create multi-paragraph essays to convey information about a topic that:
      1. present effective introductions and concluding paragraphs;
      2. guide and inform the reader's understanding of key ideas and evidence;
      3. include specific facts, details, and examples in an appropriately organized structure; and
      4. use a variety of sentence structures and transitions to link paragraphs;
    2. write informal letters that convey ideas, include important information, demonstrate a sense of closure, and use appropriate conventions (e.g., date, salutation, closing);
    3. write responses to literary or expository texts and provide evidence from the text to demonstrate understanding.

 

 

TEKS 110.19, Grade 7

▲Top

 

  1. Writing/Writing Process. Students use elements of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing) to compose text. Students are expected to:
    1. plan a first draft by selecting a genre appropriate for conveying the intended meaning to an audience, determining appropriate topics through a range of strategies (e.g., discussion, background reading, personal interests, interviews), and developing a thesis or controlling idea;
    2. develop drafts by choosing an appropriate organizational strategy (e.g., sequence of events, cause-effect, compare-contrast) and building on ideas to create a focused, organized, and coherent piece of writing;
    3. revise drafts to ensure precise word choice and vivid images; consistent point of view; use of simple, compound, and complex sentences; internal and external coherence; and the use of effective transitions after rethinking how well questions of purpose, audience, and genre have been addressed;
    4. edit drafts for grammar, mechanics, and spelling; and
    5. revise final draft in response to feedback from peers and teacher and publish written work for appropriate audiences.

 

  1. Writing/Expository and Procedural Texts. Students write expository and procedural or work-related texts to communicate ideas and information to specific audiences for specific purposes. Students are expected to:
    1. write a multi-paragraph essay to convey information about a topic that:
      1. presents effective introductions and concluding paragraphs;
      2. contains a clearly stated purpose or controlling idea;
      3. is logically organized with appropriate facts and details and includes no extraneous information or inconsistencies;
      4. accurately synthesizes ideas from several sources; and
      5. uses a variety of sentence structures, rhetorical devices, and transitions to link paragraphs;
    2. write a letter that reflects an opinion, registers a complaint, or requests information in a business or friendly context;
    3. write responses to literary or expository texts that demonstrate the writing skills for multi-paragraph essays and provide sustained evidence from the text using quotations when appropriate.
       

 

TEKS 110.20, Grade 8

▲Top

 

  1. Writing/Writing Process. Students use elements of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing) to compose text. Students are expected to:
    1. plan a first draft by selecting a genre appropriate for conveying the intended meaning to an audience, determining appropriate topics through a range of strategies (e.g., discussion, background reading, personal interests, interviews), and developing a thesis or controlling idea;
    2. develop drafts by choosing an appropriate organizational strategy (e.g., sequence of events, cause-effect, compare-contrast) and building on ideas to create a focused, organized, and coherent piece of writing;
    3. revise drafts to ensure precise word choice and vivid images; consistent point of view; use of simple, compound, and complex sentences; internal and external coherence; and the use of effective transitions after rethinking how well questions of purpose, audience, and genre have been addressed;
    4. edit drafts for grammar, mechanics, and spelling; and
    5. revise final draft in response to feedback from peers and teacher and publish written work for appropriate audiences.

 

  1. Writing/Expository and Procedural Texts. Students write expository and procedural or work-related texts to communicate ideas and information to specific audiences for specific purposes. Students are expected to:
    1. write a multi-paragraph essay to convey information about a topic that:
      1. presents effective introductions and concluding paragraphs;
      2. contains a clearly stated purpose or controlling idea;
      3. is logically organized with appropriate facts and details and includes no extraneous information or inconsistencies;
      4. accurately synthesizes ideas from several sources; and
      5. uses a variety of sentence structures, rhetorical devices, and transitions to link paragraphs;
    2. write a letter that reflects an opinion, registers a complaint, or requests information in a business or friendly context;
    3. write responses to literary or expository texts that demonstrate the writing skills for multi-paragraph essays and provide sustained evidence from the text using quotations when appropriate;

 

 

 


 

Narrative 

https://tea.texas.gov/curriculum/teks/ 

 

TEKS 110.18, Grade 6

▲Top

 

  1. Writing/Writing Process. Students use elements of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing) to compose text. Students are expected to:
    1. plan a first draft by selecting a genre appropriate for conveying the intended meaning to an audience, determining appropriate topics through a range of strategies (e.g., discussion, background reading, personal interests, interviews), and developing a thesis or controlling idea;
    2. develop drafts by choosing an appropriate organizational strategy (e.g., sequence of events, cause-effect, compare-contrast) and building on ideas to create a focused, organized, and coherent piece of writing;
    3. revise drafts to clarify meaning, enhance style, include simple and compound sentences, and improve transitions by adding, deleting, combining, and rearranging sentences or larger units of text after rethinking how well questions of purpose, audience, and genre have been addressed;
    4. edit drafts for grammar, mechanics, and spelling; and
    5. revise final draft in response to feedback from peers and teacher and publish written work for appropriate audiences.

 

  1. Writing/Literary Texts. Students write literary texts to express their ideas and feelings about real or imagined people, events, and ideas. Students are expected to:
    1. write imaginative stories that include:
      1. dialogue that develops the story; and
      2. a specific, believable setting created through the use of sensory details; and
      3. a clearly defined focus, plot, and point of view;

 

  1. Writing. Students write about their own experiences. Students are expected to write a personal narrative that has a clearly defined focus and communicates the importance of or reasons for actions and/or consequences.

 

 

TEKS 110.19, Grade 7

▲Top

 

  1.  Writing/Writing Process. Students use elements of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing) to compose text. Students are expected to:
    1. plan a first draft by selecting a genre appropriate for conveying the intended meaning to an audience, determining appropriate topics through a range of strategies (e.g., discussion, background reading, personal interests, interviews), and developing a thesis or controlling idea;
    2. develop drafts by choosing an appropriate organizational strategy (e.g., sequence of events, cause-effect, compare-contrast) and building on ideas to create a focused, organized, and coherent piece of writing;
    3. revise drafts to ensure precise word choice and vivid images; consistent point of view; use of simple, compound, and complex sentences; internal and external coherence; and the use of effective transitions after rethinking how well questions of purpose, audience, and genre have been addressed;
    4. edit drafts for grammar, mechanics, and spelling; and
    5. revise final draft in response to feedback from peers and teacher and publish written work for appropriate audiences.

 

  1. Writing/Literary Texts. Students write literary texts to express their ideas and feelings about real or imagined people, events, and ideas. Students are expected to:
    1. write an imaginative story that:
      1. sustains reader interest;
      2. includes well-paced action and an engaging story line;
      3. creates a specific, believable setting through the use of sensory details;
      4. develops interesting characters; and
      5. uses a range of literary strategies and devices to enhance the style and tone; and

 

  1. Writing. Students write about their own experiences. Students are expected to write a personal narrative that has a clearly defined focus and communicates the importance of or reasons for actions and/or consequences.

 

 

TEKS 110.20, Grade 8

▲Top 

 

  1. Writing/Writing Process. Students use elements of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing) to compose text. Students are expected to:
    1. plan a first draft by selecting a genre appropriate for conveying the intended meaning to an audience, determining appropriate topics through a range of strategies (e.g., discussion, background reading, personal interests, interviews), and developing a thesis or controlling idea;
    2. develop drafts by choosing an appropriate organizational strategy (e.g., sequence of events, cause-effect, compare-contrast) and building on ideas to create a focused, organized, and coherent piece of writing;
    3. revise drafts to ensure precise word choice and vivid images; consistent point of view; use of simple, compound, and complex sentences; internal and external coherence; and the use of effective transitions after rethinking how well questions of purpose, audience, and genre have been addressed;
    4. edit drafts for grammar, mechanics, and spelling; and
    5. revise final draft in response to feedback from peers and teacher and publish written work for appropriate audiences.

 

  1. Writing/Literary Texts. Students write literary texts to express their ideas and feelings about real or imagined people, events, and ideas. Students are expected to:
    1. write an imaginative story that:
      1. sustains reader interest;
      2. includes well-paced action and an engaging story line;
      3. creates a specific, believable setting through the use of sensory details;
      4. develops interesting characters; and
      5. uses a range of literary strategies and devices to enhance the style and tone;

 

  1. Writing. Students write about their own experiences. Students are expected to write a personal narrative that has a clearly defined focus and communicates the importance of or reasons for actions and/or consequences.

 

 

 


 

TEKS 110 C, Grades 9-12

 

Analysis

https://tea.texas.gov/curriculum/teks/ 

 

TEKS 110.31, English I

▲Top

 

  1. Writing/Writing Process. Students use elements of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing) to compose text. Students are expected to:
    1. plan a first draft by selecting the correct genre for conveying the intended meaning to multiple audiences, determining appropriate topics through a range of strategies (e.g., discussion, background reading, personal interests, interviews), and developing a thesis or controlling idea;
    2. structure ideas in a sustained and persuasive way (e.g., using outlines, note taking, graphic organizers, lists) and develop drafts in timed and open-ended situations that include transitions and the rhetorical devices used to convey meaning;
    3. revise drafts to improve style, word choice, figurative language, sentence variety, and subtlety of meaning after rethinking how well questions of purpose, audience, and genre have been addressed;
    4. edit drafts for grammar, mechanics, and spelling; and
    5. revise final draft in response to feedback from peers and teacher and publish written work for appropriate audiences.

 

  1. Writing/Expository and Procedural Texts. Students write expository and procedural or work-related texts to communicate ideas and information to specific audiences for specific purposes. Students are expected to:
    1. write an analytical essay of sufficient length that includes:
      1. effective introductory and concluding paragraphs and a variety of sentence structures;
      2. rhetorical devices, and transitions between paragraphs;
      3. a controlling idea or thesis;
      4. an organizing structure appropriate to purpose, audience, and context; and
      5. relevant information and valid inferences;
    2. write procedural or work-related documents (e.g., instructions, e-mails, correspondence, memos, project plans) that include:
      1. organized and accurately conveyed information; and
      2. reader-friendly formatting techniques;
    3. write an interpretative response to an expository or a literary text (e.g., essay or review) that:
      1. extends beyond a summary and literal analysis;
      2. addresses the writing skills for an analytical essay and provides evidence from the text using embedded quotations; and
      3. analyzes the aesthetic effects of an author's use of stylistic or rhetorical devices;

 

TEKS 110.32, English II

▲Top

 

  1. Writing/Writing Process. Students use elements of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing) to compose text. Students are expected to:
    1. plan a first draft by selecting the correct genre for conveying the intended meaning to multiple audiences, determining appropriate topics through a range of strategies (e.g., discussion, background reading, personal interests, interviews), and developing a thesis or controlling idea;
    2. structure ideas in a sustained and persuasive way (e.g., using outlines, note taking, graphic organizers, lists) and develop drafts in timed and open-ended situations that include transitions and rhetorical devices used to convey meaning;
    3. revise drafts to improve style, word choice, figurative language, sentence variety, and subtlety of meaning after rethinking how well questions of purpose, audience, and genre have been addressed;
    4. edit drafts for grammar, mechanics, and spelling; and
    5. revise final draft in response to feedback from peers and teacher and publish written work for appropriate audiences.

 

  1. Writing/Expository and Procedural Texts. Students write expository and procedural or work-related texts to communicate ideas and information to specific audiences for specific purposes. Students are expected to:

A. write an analytical essay of sufficient length that includes:

  1. effective introductory and concluding paragraphs and a variety of sentence structures;
  2. rhetorical devices, and transitions between paragraphs;
  3. a thesis or controlling idea;
  4. an organizing structure appropriate to purpose, audience, and context;
  5. relevant evidence and well-chosen details; and
  6. distinctions about the relative value of specific data, facts, and ideas that support the thesis statement;

C. write an interpretative response to an expository or a literary text (e.g., essay or review) that:

  1. extends beyond a summary and literal analysis;
  2. addresses the writing skills for an analytical essay and provides evidence from the text using embedded quotations; and
  3. analyzes the aesthetic effects of an author's use of stylistic and rhetorical devices;

 

 

TEKS 110.33, English III

▲Top

 

  1. Writing/Writing Process. Students use elements of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing) to compose text. Students are expected to:
    1. plan a first draft by selecting the correct genre for conveying the intended meaning to multiple audiences, determining appropriate topics through a range of strategies (e.g., discussion, background reading, personal interests, interviews), and developing a thesis or controlling idea;
    2. structure ideas in a sustained and persuasive way (e.g., using outlines, note taking, graphic organizers, lists) and develop drafts in timed and open-ended situations that include transitions and rhetorical devices to convey meaning;
    3. revise drafts to clarify meaning and achieve specific rhetorical purposes, consistency of tone, and logical organization by rearranging the words, sentences, and paragraphs to employ tropes (e.g., metaphors, similes, analogies, hyperbole, understatement, rhetorical questions, irony), schemes (e.g., parallelism, antithesis, inverted word order, repetition, reversed structures), and by adding transitional words and phrases;
    4. edit drafts for grammar, mechanics, and spelling; and
    5. revise final draft in response to feedback from peers and teacher and publish written work for appropriate audiences.

 

  1. Writing/Expository and Procedural Texts. Students write expository and procedural or work-related texts to communicate ideas and information to specific audiences for specific purposes. Students are expected to:

A. write an analytical essay of sufficient length that includes:

  1. effective introductory and concluding paragraphs and a variety of sentence structures;
  2. rhetorical devices, and transitions between paragraphs;
  3. a clear thesis statement or controlling idea;
  4. a clear organizational schema for conveying ideas;
  5. relevant and substantial evidence and well-chosen details; and
  6. information on multiple relevant perspectives and a consideration of the validity, reliability, and relevance of primary and secondary sources;

C. write an interpretation of an expository or a literary text that:

  1. advances a clear thesis statement;
  2. addresses the writing skills for an analytical essay, including references to and commentary on quotations from the text;
  3. analyzes the aesthetic effects of an author's use of stylistic or rhetorical devices;
  4. identifies and analyzes the ambiguities, nuances, and complexities within the text; and
  5. anticipates and responds to readers' questions or contradictory information;

 

 

TEKS 110.34, English IV

▲Top

 

  1. Writing/Writing Process. Students use elements of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing) to compose text. Students are expected to:
    1. plan a first draft by selecting the correct genre for conveying the intended meaning to multiple audiences, determining appropriate topics through a range of strategies (e.g., discussion, background reading, personal interests, interviews), and developing a thesis or controlling idea;
    2. structure ideas in a sustained and persuasive way (e.g., using outlines, note taking, graphic organizers, lists) and develop drafts in timed and open-ended situations that include transitions and the rhetorical devices to convey meaning;
    3. revise drafts to clarify meaning and achieve specific rhetorical purposes, consistency of tone, and logical organization by rearranging the words, sentences, and paragraphs to employ tropes (e.g., metaphors, similes, analogies, hyperbole, understatement, rhetorical questions, irony), schemes (e.g., parallelism, antithesis, inverted word order, repetition, reversed structures), and by adding transitional words and phrases;
    4. edit drafts for grammar, mechanics, and spelling; and
    5. revise final draft in response to feedback from peers and teacher and publish written work for appropriate audiences.

 

  1. Writing/Expository and Procedural Texts. Students write expository and procedural or work-related texts to communicate ideas and information to specific audiences for specific purposes. Students are expected to:

A. write an analytical essay of sufficient length that includes:

  1. effective introductory and concluding paragraphs and a variety of sentence structures;
  2. rhetorical devices, and transitions between paragraphs;
  3. a clear thesis statement or controlling idea;
  4. a clear organizational schema for conveying ideas;
  5. relevant and substantial evidence and well-chosen details;
  6. information on all relevant perspectives and consideration of the validity, reliability, and relevance of primary and secondary sources; and
  7. an analysis of views and information that contradict the thesis statement and the evidence presented for it;

C.  write an interpretation of an expository or a literary text that:

  1. advances a clear thesis statement;
  2. addresses the writing skills for an analytical essay including references to and commentary on quotations from the text;
  3. analyzes the aesthetic effects of an author's use of stylistic or rhetorical devices;
  4. identifies and analyzes ambiguities, nuances, and complexities within the text; and
  5. anticipates and responds to readers' questions and contradictory information;

 

 

 


 

Argumentative

https://tea.texas.gov/curriculum/teks/ 

 

TEKS 110.31, English I

▲Top 

   

  1. Writing/Writing Process. Students use elements of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing) to compose text. Students are expected to:
    1. plan a first draft by selecting the correct genre for conveying the intended meaning to multiple audiences, determining appropriate topics through a range of strategies (e.g., discussion, background reading, personal interests, interviews), and developing a thesis or controlling idea;
    2. structure ideas in a sustained and persuasive way (e.g., using outlines, note taking, graphic organizers, lists) and develop drafts in timed and open-ended situations that include transitions and the rhetorical devices used to convey meaning;
    3. revise drafts to improve style, word choice, figurative language, sentence variety, and subtlety of meaning after rethinking how well questions of purpose, audience, and genre have been addressed;
    4. edit drafts for grammar, mechanics, and spelling; and
    5. revise final draft in response to feedback from peers and teacher and publish written work for appropriate audiences.

 

  1. Writing/Persuasive Texts. Students write persuasive texts to influence the attitudes or actions of a specific audience on specific issues. Students are expected to write an argumentative essay to the appropriate audience that includes:
    1. a clear thesis or position based on logical reasons supported by precise and relevant evidence;
    2. consideration of the whole range of information and views on the topic and accurate and honest representation of these views;
    3. counter-arguments based on evidence to anticipate and address objections;
    4. an organizing structure appropriate to the purpose, audience, and context; and
    5. an analysis of the relative value of specific data, facts, and ideas.

 

 

TEKS 110.32, English II

▲Top

  

  1. Writing/Writing Process. Students use elements of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing) to compose text. Students are expected to:
    1. plan a first draft by selecting the correct genre for conveying the intended meaning to multiple audiences, determining appropriate topics through a range of strategies (e.g., discussion, background reading, personal interests, interviews), and developing a thesis or controlling idea;
    2. structure ideas in a sustained and persuasive way (e.g., using outlines, note taking, graphic organizers, lists) and develop drafts in timed and open-ended situations that include transitions and rhetorical devices used to convey meaning;
    3. revise drafts to improve style, word choice, figurative language, sentence variety, and subtlety of meaning after rethinking how well questions of purpose, audience, and genre have been addressed;
    4. edit drafts for grammar, mechanics, and spelling; and
    5. revise final draft in response to feedback from peers and teacher and publish written work for appropriate audiences.

 

  1. Writing/Persuasive Texts. Students write persuasive texts to influence the attitudes or actions of a specific audience on specific issues. Students are expected to write an argumentative essay to the appropriate audience that includes:
    1. a clear thesis or position based on logical reasons supported by precise and relevant evidence;
    2. consideration of the whole range of information and views on the topic and accurate and honest representation of these views (i.e., in the author's own words and not out of context);
    3. counter-arguments based on evidence to anticipate and address objections;
    4. an organizing structure appropriate to the purpose, audience, and context;
    5. an analysis of the relative value of specific data, facts, and ideas; and
    6. a range of appropriate appeals (e.g., descriptions, anecdotes, case studies, analogies, illustrations).

 

 

TEKS 110.33, English III 

▲Top

 

  1. Writing/Writing Process. Students use elements of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing) to compose text. Students are expected to:
    1. plan a first draft by selecting the correct genre for conveying the intended meaning to multiple audiences, determining appropriate topics through a range of strategies (e.g., discussion, background reading, personal interests, interviews), and developing a thesis or controlling idea;
    2. structure ideas in a sustained and persuasive way (e.g., using outlines, note taking, graphic organizers, lists) and develop drafts in timed and open-ended situations that include transitions and rhetorical devices to convey meaning;
    3. revise drafts to clarify meaning and achieve specific rhetorical purposes, consistency of tone, and logical organization by rearranging the words, sentences, and paragraphs to employ tropes (e.g., metaphors, similes, analogies, hyperbole, understatement, rhetorical questions, irony), schemes (e.g., parallelism, antithesis, inverted word order, repetition, reversed structures), and by adding transitional words and phrases;
    4. edit drafts for grammar, mechanics, and spelling; and
    5. revise final draft in response to feedback from peers and teacher and publish written work for appropriate audiences.

 

  1. Writing/Persuasive Texts. Students write persuasive texts to influence the attitudes or actions of a specific audience on specific issues. Students are expected to write an argumentative essay (e.g., evaluative essays, proposals) to the appropriate audience that includes:
    1. a clear thesis or position based on logical reasons supported by precise and relevant evidence, including facts, expert opinions, quotations, and/or expressions of commonly accepted beliefs;
    2. accurate and honest representation of divergent views (i.e., in the author's own words and not out of context);
    3. an organizing structure appropriate to the purpose, audience, and context;
    4. information on the complete range of relevant perspectives;
    5. demonstrated consideration of the validity and reliability of all primary and secondary sources used; and
    6. language attentively crafted to move a disinterested or opposed audience, using specific rhetorical devices to back up assertions (e.g., appeals to logic, emotions, ethical beliefs).

 

 

TEKS 110.34, English IV

▲Top

 

  1. Writing/Writing Process. Students use elements of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing) to compose text. Students are expected to:
    1. plan a first draft by selecting the correct genre for conveying the intended meaning to multiple audiences, determining appropriate topics through a range of strategies (e.g., discussion, background reading, personal interests, interviews), and developing a thesis or controlling idea;
    2. structure ideas in a sustained and persuasive way (e.g., using outlines, note taking, graphic organizers, lists) and develop drafts in timed and open-ended situations that include transitions and the rhetorical devices to convey meaning;
    3. revise drafts to clarify meaning and achieve specific rhetorical purposes, consistency of tone, and logical organization by rearranging the words, sentences, and paragraphs to employ tropes (e.g., metaphors, similes, analogies, hyperbole, understatement, rhetorical questions, irony), schemes (e.g., parallelism, antithesis, inverted word order, repetition, reversed structures), and by adding transitional words and phrases;
    4. edit drafts for grammar, mechanics, and spelling; and
    5. revise final draft in response to feedback from peers and teacher and publish written work for appropriate audiences.

 

  1. Writing/Persuasive Texts. Students write persuasive texts to influence the attitudes or actions of a specific audience on specific issues. Students are expected to write an argumentative essay (e.g., evaluative essays, proposals) to the appropriate audience that includes:
    1. a clear thesis or position based on logical reasons with various forms of support (e.g., hard evidence, reason, common sense, cultural assumptions);
    2. accurate and honest representation of divergent views (i.e., in the author's own words and not out of context);
    3. an organizing structure appropriate to the purpose, audience, and context;
    4. information on the complete range of relevant perspectives;
    5. demonstrated consideration of the validity and reliability of all primary and secondary sources used;

 

 

 


 

Historical Analysis

https://tea.texas.gov/curriculum/teks/

 

TEKS 110.31, English I

▲Top

   

  1. Writing/Writing Process. Students use elements of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing) to compose text. Students are expected to:
    1. plan a first draft by selecting the correct genre for conveying the intended meaning to multiple audiences, determining appropriate topics through a range of strategies (e.g., discussion, background reading, personal interests, interviews), and developing a thesis or controlling idea;
    2. structure ideas in a sustained and persuasive way (e.g., using outlines, note taking, graphic organizers, lists) and develop drafts in timed and open-ended situations that include transitions and the rhetorical devices used to convey meaning;
    3. revise drafts to improve style, word choice, figurative language, sentence variety, and subtlety of meaning after rethinking how well questions of purpose, audience, and genre have been addressed;
    4. edit drafts for grammar, mechanics, and spelling; and
    5. revise final draft in response to feedback from peers and teacher and publish written work for appropriate audiences.

 

  1. Writing/Expository and Procedural Texts. Students write expository and procedural or work-related texts to communicate ideas and information to specific audiences for specific purposes. Students are expected to:
    1. write an analytical essay of sufficient length that includes:
      1. effective introductory and concluding paragraphs and a variety of sentence structures;
      2. rhetorical devices, and transitions between paragraphs;
      3. a controlling idea or thesis;
      4. an organizing structure appropriate to purpose, audience, and context; and
      5. relevant information and valid inferences;
    2. write procedural or work-related documents (e.g., instructions, e-mails, correspondence, memos, project plans) that include:
      1. organized and accurately conveyed information; and
      2. reader-friendly formatting techniques;
    3. write an interpretative response to an expository or a literary text (e.g., essay or review) that:
      1. extends beyond a summary and literal analysis;
      2. addresses the writing skills for an analytical essay and provides evidence from the text using embedded quotations; and
      3. analyzes the aesthetic effects of an author's use of stylistic or rhetorical devices;

 

  1. Writing/Persuasive Texts. Students write persuasive texts to influence the attitudes or actions of a specific audience on specific issues. Students are expected to write an argumentative essay to the appropriate audience that includes:
    1. a clear thesis or position based on logical reasons supported by precise and relevant evidence;
    2. consideration of the whole range of information and views on the topic and accurate and honest representation of these views;
    3. counter-arguments based on evidence to anticipate and address objections;
    4. an organizing structure appropriate to the purpose, audience, and context; and
    5. an analysis of the relative value of specific data, facts, and ideas.

 

 

TEKS 110.32, English II

▲Top

  

  1. Writing/Writing Process. Students use elements of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing) to compose text. Students are expected to:
    1. plan a first draft by selecting the correct genre for conveying the intended meaning to multiple audiences, determining appropriate topics through a range of strategies (e.g., discussion, background reading, personal interests, interviews), and developing a thesis or controlling idea;
    2. structure ideas in a sustained and persuasive way (e.g., using outlines, note taking, graphic organizers, lists) and develop drafts in timed and open-ended situations that include transitions and rhetorical devices used to convey meaning;
    3. revise drafts to improve style, word choice, figurative language, sentence variety, and subtlety of meaning after rethinking how well questions of purpose, audience, and genre have been addressed;
    4. edit drafts for grammar, mechanics, and spelling; and
    5. revise final draft in response to feedback from peers and teacher and publish written work for appropriate audiences.

 

  1. Writing/Expository and Procedural Texts. Students write expository and procedural or work-related texts to communicate ideas and information to specific audiences for specific purposes. Students are expected to:

A. write an analytical essay of sufficient length that includes:

  1. effective introductory and concluding paragraphs and a variety of sentence structures;
  2. rhetorical devices, and transitions between paragraphs;
  3. a thesis or controlling idea;
  4. an organizing structure appropriate to purpose, audience, and context;
  5. relevant evidence and well-chosen details; and
  6. distinctions about the relative value of specific data, facts, and ideas that support the thesis statement;

C. write an interpretative response to an expository or a literary text (e.g., essay or review) that:

  1. extends beyond a summary and literal analysis;
  2. addresses the writing skills for an analytical essay and provides evidence from the text using embedded quotations; and
  3. analyzes the aesthetic effects of an author's use of stylistic and rhetorical devices;

 

  1. Writing/Persuasive Texts. Students write persuasive texts to influence the attitudes or actions of a specific audience on specific issues. Students are expected to write an argumentative essay to the appropriate audience that includes:
    1. a clear thesis or position based on logical reasons supported by precise and relevant evidence;
    2. consideration of the whole range of information and views on the topic and accurate and honest representation of these views (i.e., in the author's own words and not out of context);
    3. counter-arguments based on evidence to anticipate and address objections;
    4. an organizing structure appropriate to the purpose, audience, and context;
    5. an analysis of the relative value of specific data, facts, and ideas; and
    6. a range of appropriate appeals (e.g., descriptions, anecdotes, case studies, analogies, illustrations).

 

 

TEKS 110.33, English III 

▲Top

 

  1. Writing/Writing Process. Students use elements of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing) to compose text. Students are expected to:
    1. plan a first draft by selecting the correct genre for conveying the intended meaning to multiple audiences, determining appropriate topics through a range of strategies (e.g., discussion, background reading, personal interests, interviews), and developing a thesis or controlling idea;
    2. structure ideas in a sustained and persuasive way (e.g., using outlines, note taking, graphic organizers, lists) and develop drafts in timed and open-ended situations that include transitions and rhetorical devices to convey meaning;
    3. revise drafts to clarify meaning and achieve specific rhetorical purposes, consistency of tone, and logical organization by rearranging the words, sentences, and paragraphs to employ tropes (e.g., metaphors, similes, analogies, hyperbole, understatement, rhetorical questions, irony), schemes (e.g., parallelism, antithesis, inverted word order, repetition, reversed structures), and by adding transitional words and phrases;
    4. edit drafts for grammar, mechanics, and spelling; and
    5. revise final draft in response to feedback from peers and teacher and publish written work for appropriate audiences.

 

  1. Writing/Expository and Procedural Texts. Students write expository and procedural or work-related texts to communicate ideas and information to specific audiences for specific purposes. Students are expected to:

A. write an analytical essay of sufficient length that includes:

  1. effective introductory and concluding paragraphs and a variety of sentence structures;
  2. rhetorical devices, and transitions between paragraphs;
  3. a clear thesis statement or controlling idea;
  4. a clear organizational schema for conveying ideas;
  5. relevant and substantial evidence and well-chosen details; and
  6. information on multiple relevant perspectives and a consideration of the validity, reliability, and relevance of primary and secondary sources;

C. write an interpretation of an expository or a literary text that:

  1. advances a clear thesis statement;
  2. addresses the writing skills for an analytical essay, including references to and commentary on quotations from the text;
  3. analyzes the aesthetic effects of an author's use of stylistic or rhetorical devices;
  4. identifies and analyzes the ambiguities, nuances, and complexities within the text; and
  5. anticipates and responds to readers' questions or contradictory information;

 

  1. Writing/Persuasive Texts. Students write persuasive texts to influence the attitudes or actions of a specific audience on specific issues. Students are expected to write an argumentative essay (e.g., evaluative essays, proposals) to the appropriate audience that includes:
    1. a clear thesis or position based on logical reasons supported by precise and relevant evidence, including facts, expert opinions, quotations, and/or expressions of commonly accepted beliefs;
    2. accurate and honest representation of divergent views (i.e., in the author's own words and not out of context);
    3. an organizing structure appropriate to the purpose, audience, and context;
    4. information on the complete range of relevant perspectives;
    5. demonstrated consideration of the validity and reliability of all primary and secondary sources used; and
    6. language attentively crafted to move a disinterested or opposed audience, using specific rhetorical devices to back up assertions (e.g., appeals to logic, emotions, ethical beliefs).

 

 

TEKS 110.34, English IV

▲Top

 

  1. Writing/Writing Process. Students use elements of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing) to compose text. Students are expected to:
    1. plan a first draft by selecting the correct genre for conveying the intended meaning to multiple audiences, determining appropriate topics through a range of strategies (e.g., discussion, background reading, personal interests, interviews), and developing a thesis or controlling idea;
    2. structure ideas in a sustained and persuasive way (e.g., using outlines, note taking, graphic organizers, lists) and develop drafts in timed and open-ended situations that include transitions and the rhetorical devices to convey meaning;
    3. revise drafts to clarify meaning and achieve specific rhetorical purposes, consistency of tone, and logical organization by rearranging the words, sentences, and paragraphs to employ tropes (e.g., metaphors, similes, analogies, hyperbole, understatement, rhetorical questions, irony), schemes (e.g., parallelism, antithesis, inverted word order, repetition, reversed structures), and by adding transitional words and phrases;
    4. edit drafts for grammar, mechanics, and spelling; and
    5. revise final draft in response to feedback from peers and teacher and publish written work for appropriate audiences.

 

  1. Writing/Expository and Procedural Texts. Students write expository and procedural or work-related texts to communicate ideas and information to specific audiences for specific purposes. Students are expected to:

A. write an analytical essay of sufficient length that includes:

  1. effective introductory and concluding paragraphs and a variety of sentence structures;
  2. rhetorical devices, and transitions between paragraphs;
  3. a clear thesis statement or controlling idea;
  4. a clear organizational schema for conveying ideas;
  5. relevant and substantial evidence and well-chosen details;
  6. information on all relevant perspectives and consideration of the validity, reliability, and relevance of primary and secondary sources; and
  7. an analysis of views and information that contradict the thesis statement and the evidence presented for it;

C.  write an interpretation of an expository or a literary text that:

  1. advances a clear thesis statement;
  2. addresses the writing skills for an analytical essay including references to and commentary on quotations from the text;
  3. analyzes the aesthetic effects of an author's use of stylistic or rhetorical devices;
  4. identifies and analyzes ambiguities, nuances, and complexities within the text; and
  5. anticipates and responds to readers' questions and contradictory information;

 

  1. Writing/Persuasive Texts. Students write persuasive texts to influence the attitudes or actions of a specific audience on specific issues. Students are expected to write an argumentative essay (e.g., evaluative essays, proposals) to the appropriate audience that includes:
    1. a clear thesis or position based on logical reasons with various forms of support (e.g., hard evidence, reason, common sense, cultural assumptions);
    2. accurate and honest representation of divergent views (i.e., in the author's own words and not out of context);
    3. an organizing structure appropriate to the purpose, audience, and context;
    4. information on the complete range of relevant perspectives;
    5. demonstrated consideration of the validity and reliability of all primary and secondary sources used;

 

 

 


 

Informative

https://tea.texas.gov/curriculum/teks/ 

 

TEKS 110.31, English I 

▲Top

 

  1. Writing/Writing Process. Students use elements of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing) to compose text. Students are expected to:
    1. plan a first draft by selecting the correct genre for conveying the intended meaning to multiple audiences, determining appropriate topics through a range of strategies (e.g., discussion, background reading, personal interests, interviews), and developing a thesis or controlling idea;
    2. structure ideas in a sustained and persuasive way (e.g., using outlines, note taking, graphic organizers, lists) and develop drafts in timed and open-ended situations that include transitions and the rhetorical devices used to convey meaning;
    3. revise drafts to improve style, word choice, figurative language, sentence variety, and subtlety of meaning after rethinking how well questions of purpose, audience, and genre have been addressed;
    4. edit drafts for grammar, mechanics, and spelling; and
    5. revise final draft in response to feedback from peers and teacher and publish written work for appropriate audiences.

 

  1. Writing/Expository and Procedural Texts. Students write expository and procedural or work-related texts to communicate ideas and information to specific audiences for specific purposes. Students are expected to:
    1. write an analytical essay of sufficient length that includes:
      1. effective introductory and concluding paragraphs and a variety of sentence structures;
      2. rhetorical devices, and transitions between paragraphs;
      3. a controlling idea or thesis;
      4. an organizing structure appropriate to purpose, audience, and context; and
      5. relevant information and valid inferences;
    2. write procedural or work-related documents (e.g., instructions, e-mails, correspondence, memos, project plans) that include:
      1. organized and accurately conveyed information; and
      2. reader-friendly formatting techniques;
    3. write an interpretative response to an expository or a literary text (e.g., essay or review) that:
      1. extends beyond a summary and literal analysis;
      2. addresses the writing skills for an analytical essay and provides evidence from the text using embedded quotations; and
      3. analyzes the aesthetic effects of an author's use of stylistic or rhetorical devices;

 

TEKS 110.32, English II

▲Top

 

  1. Writing/Writing Process. Students use elements of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing) to compose text. Students are expected to:
    1. plan a first draft by selecting the correct genre for conveying the intended meaning to multiple audiences, determining appropriate topics through a range of strategies (e.g., discussion, background reading, personal interests, interviews), and developing a thesis or controlling idea;
    2. structure ideas in a sustained and persuasive way (e.g., using outlines, note taking, graphic organizers, lists) and develop drafts in timed and open-ended situations that include transitions and rhetorical devices used to convey meaning;
    3. revise drafts to improve style, word choice, figurative language, sentence variety, and subtlety of meaning after rethinking how well questions of purpose, audience, and genre have been addressed;
    4. edit drafts for grammar, mechanics, and spelling; and
    5. revise final draft in response to feedback from peers and teacher and publish written work for appropriate audiences.

 

  1. Writing/Expository and Procedural Texts. Students write expository and procedural or work-related texts to communicate ideas and information to specific audiences for specific purposes. Students are expected to:

A. write an analytical essay of sufficient length that includes:

  1. effective introductory and concluding paragraphs and a variety of sentence structures;
  2. rhetorical devices, and transitions between paragraphs;
  3. a thesis or controlling idea;
  4. an organizing structure appropriate to purpose, audience, and context;
  5. relevant evidence and well-chosen details; and
  6. distinctions about the relative value of specific data, facts, and ideas that support the thesis statement;

C. write an interpretative response to an expository or a literary text (e.g., essay or review) that:

  1. extends beyond a summary and literal analysis;
  2. addresses the writing skills for an analytical essay and provides evidence from the text using embedded quotations; and
  3. analyzes the aesthetic effects of an author's use of stylistic and rhetorical devices;

 

 

TEKS 110.33, English III

▲Top

 

  1. Writing/Writing Process. Students use elements of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing) to compose text. Students are expected to:
    1. plan a first draft by selecting the correct genre for conveying the intended meaning to multiple audiences, determining appropriate topics through a range of strategies (e.g., discussion, background reading, personal interests, interviews), and developing a thesis or controlling idea;
    2. structure ideas in a sustained and persuasive way (e.g., using outlines, note taking, graphic organizers, lists) and develop drafts in timed and open-ended situations that include transitions and rhetorical devices to convey meaning;
    3. revise drafts to clarify meaning and achieve specific rhetorical purposes, consistency of tone, and logical organization by rearranging the words, sentences, and paragraphs to employ tropes (e.g., metaphors, similes, analogies, hyperbole, understatement, rhetorical questions, irony), schemes (e.g., parallelism, antithesis, inverted word order, repetition, reversed structures), and by adding transitional words and phrases;
    4. edit drafts for grammar, mechanics, and spelling; and
    5. revise final draft in response to feedback from peers and teacher and publish written work for appropriate audiences.

 

  1. Writing/Expository and Procedural Texts. Students write expository and procedural or work-related texts to communicate ideas and information to specific audiences for specific purposes. Students are expected to:

A. write an analytical essay of sufficient length that includes:

  1. effective introductory and concluding paragraphs and a variety of sentence structures;
  2. rhetorical devices, and transitions between paragraphs;
  3. a clear thesis statement or controlling idea;
  4. a clear organizational schema for conveying ideas;
  5. relevant and substantial evidence and well-chosen details; and
  6. information on multiple relevant perspectives and a consideration of the validity, reliability, and relevance of primary and secondary sources;

C. write an interpretation of an expository or a literary text that:

  1. advances a clear thesis statement;
  2. addresses the writing skills for an analytical essay, including references to and commentary on quotations from the text;
  3. analyzes the aesthetic effects of an author's use of stylistic or rhetorical devices;
  4. identifies and analyzes the ambiguities, nuances, and complexities within the text; and
  5. anticipates and responds to readers' questions or contradictory information;

 

 

TEKS 110.34, English IV

▲Top

 

  1. Writing/Writing Process. Students use elements of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing) to compose text. Students are expected to:
    1. plan a first draft by selecting the correct genre for conveying the intended meaning to multiple audiences, determining appropriate topics through a range of strategies (e.g., discussion, background reading, personal interests, interviews), and developing a thesis or controlling idea;
    2. structure ideas in a sustained and persuasive way (e.g., using outlines, note taking, graphic organizers, lists) and develop drafts in timed and open-ended situations that include transitions and the rhetorical devices to convey meaning;
    3. revise drafts to clarify meaning and achieve specific rhetorical purposes, consistency of tone, and logical organization by rearranging the words, sentences, and paragraphs to employ tropes (e.g., metaphors, similes, analogies, hyperbole, understatement, rhetorical questions, irony), schemes (e.g., parallelism, antithesis, inverted word order, repetition, reversed structures), and by adding transitional words and phrases;
    4. edit drafts for grammar, mechanics, and spelling; and
    5. revise final draft in response to feedback from peers and teacher and publish written work for appropriate audiences.

 

  1. Writing/Expository and Procedural Texts. Students write expository and procedural or work-related texts to communicate ideas and information to specific audiences for specific purposes. Students are expected to:

A. write an analytical essay of sufficient length that includes:

  1. effective introductory and concluding paragraphs and a variety of sentence structures;
  2. rhetorical devices, and transitions between paragraphs;
  3. a clear thesis statement or controlling idea;
  4. a clear organizational schema for conveying ideas;
  5. relevant and substantial evidence and well-chosen details;
  6. information on all relevant perspectives and consideration of the validity, reliability, and relevance of primary and secondary sources; and
  7. an analysis of views and information that contradict the thesis statement and the evidence presented for it;

C.  write an interpretation of an expository or a literary text that:

  1. advances a clear thesis statement;
  2. addresses the writing skills for an analytical essay including references to and commentary on quotations from the text;
  3. analyzes the aesthetic effects of an author's use of stylistic or rhetorical devices;
  4. identifies and analyzes ambiguities, nuances, and complexities within the text; and
  5. anticipates and responds to readers' questions and contradictory information;

 

 

 


 

Narrative 

https://tea.texas.gov/curriculum/teks/ 

 

TEKS 110.31, English I 

▲Top

 

  1. Writing/Writing Process. Students use elements of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing) to compose text. Students are expected to:
    1. plan a first draft by selecting the correct genre for conveying the intended meaning to multiple audiences, determining appropriate topics through a range of strategies (e.g., discussion, background reading, personal interests, interviews), and developing a thesis or controlling idea;
    2. structure ideas in a sustained and persuasive way (e.g., using outlines, note taking, graphic organizers, lists) and develop drafts in timed and open-ended situations that include transitions and the rhetorical devices used to convey meaning;
    3. revise drafts to improve style, word choice, figurative language, sentence variety, and subtlety of meaning after rethinking how well questions of purpose, audience, and genre have been addressed;
    4. edit drafts for grammar, mechanics, and spelling; and
    5. revise final draft in response to feedback from peers and teacher and publish written work for appropriate audiences.
       
  2. Writing/Literary Texts. Students write literary texts to express their ideas and feelings about real or imagined people, events, and ideas. Students are responsible for at least two forms of literary writing. Students are expected to:
    1. write an engaging story with a well-developed conflict and resolution, interesting and believable characters, and a range of literary strategies (e.g., dialogue, suspense) and devices to enhance the plot;

 

 

TEKS 110.32, English II

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  1. Writing/Writing Process. Students use elements of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing) to compose text. Students are expected to:
    1. plan a first draft by selecting the correct genre for conveying the intended meaning to multiple audiences, determining appropriate topics through a range of strategies (e.g., discussion, background reading, personal interests, interviews), and developing a thesis or controlling idea;
    2. structure ideas in a sustained and persuasive way (e.g., using outlines, note taking, graphic organizers, lists) and develop drafts in timed and open-ended situations that include transitions and rhetorical devices used to convey meaning;
    3. revise drafts to improve style, word choice, figurative language, sentence variety, and subtlety of meaning after rethinking how well questions of purpose, audience, and genre have been addressed;
    4. edit drafts for grammar, mechanics, and spelling; and
    5. revise final draft in response to feedback from peers and teacher and publish written work for appropriate audiences.
       
  2. Writing/Literary Texts. Students write literary texts to express their ideas and feelings about real or imagined people, events, and ideas. Students are responsible for at least two forms of literary writing. Students are expected to:
    1. write an engaging story with a well-developed conflict and resolution, interesting and believable characters, a range of literary strategies (e.g., dialogue, suspense) and devices to enhance the plot, and sensory details that define the mood or tone;

 

 

TEKS 110.33, English III 

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  1. Writing/Writing Process. Students use elements of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing) to compose text. Students are expected to:
    1. plan a first draft by selecting the correct genre for conveying the intended meaning to multiple audiences, determining appropriate topics through a range of strategies (e.g., discussion, background reading, personal interests, interviews), and developing a thesis or controlling idea;
    2. structure ideas in a sustained and persuasive way (e.g., using outlines, note taking, graphic organizers, lists) and develop drafts in timed and open-ended situations that include transitions and rhetorical devices to convey meaning;
    3. revise drafts to clarify meaning and achieve specific rhetorical purposes, consistency of tone, and logical organization by rearranging the words, sentences, and paragraphs to employ tropes (e.g., metaphors, similes, analogies, hyperbole, understatement, rhetorical questions, irony), schemes (e.g., parallelism, antithesis, inverted word order, repetition, reversed structures), and by adding transitional words and phrases;
    4. edit drafts for grammar, mechanics, and spelling; and
    5. revise final draft in response to feedback from peers and teacher and publish written work for appropriate audiences.

 

  1. Writing/Literary Texts. Students write literary texts to express their ideas and feelings about real or imagined people, events, and ideas. Students are responsible for at least two forms of literary writing. Students are expected to:
    1. write an engaging story with a well-developed conflict and resolution, complex and non-stereotypical characters, a range of literary strategies (e.g., dialogue, suspense) and devices to enhance the plot, and sensory details that define the mood or tone;

 

 

TEKS 110.34, English IV 

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  1. Writing/Writing Process. Students use elements of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing) to compose text. Students are expected to:
    1. plan a first draft by selecting the correct genre for conveying the intended meaning to multiple audiences, determining appropriate topics through a range of strategies (e.g., discussion, background reading, personal interests, interviews), and developing a thesis or controlling idea;
    2. structure ideas in a sustained and persuasive way (e.g., using outlines, note taking, graphic organizers, lists) and develop drafts in timed and open-ended situations that include transitions and the rhetorical devices to convey meaning;
    3. revise drafts to clarify meaning and achieve specific rhetorical purposes, consistency of tone, and logical organization by rearranging the words, sentences, and paragraphs to employ tropes (e.g., metaphors, similes, analogies, hyperbole, understatement, rhetorical questions, irony), schemes (e.g., parallelism, antithesis, inverted word order, repetition, reversed structures), and by adding transitional words and phrases;
    4. edit drafts for grammar, mechanics, and spelling; and
    5. revise final draft in response to feedback from peers and teacher and publish written work for appropriate audiences.

 

  1. Writing/Literary Texts. Students write literary texts to express their ideas and feelings about real or imagined people, events, and ideas. Students are responsible for at least two forms of literary writing. Students are expected to:
    1. write an engaging story with a well-developed conflict and resolution, a clear theme, complex and non-stereotypical characters, a range of literary strategies (e.g., dialogue, suspense), devices to enhance the plot, and sensory details that define the mood or tone;

 

 

 

 

 

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